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don't pay taxes and, in his words, are dependent on government, so he couldn't worry about them and their votes. >> in this case, i said something that's just completely wrong. and i absolutely believe, however, that my life has shown that i care about the 100% and that has been demonstrated throughout my life. this whole campaign is about the 100%. when i become president, it'll be about helping the 100%. >> brown: still, president obama was having none of it. >> from the day we began this campaign, we've always said that real change takes time. it takes more than one year or one term, or even one president. it takes more than one party. it certainly can't happen if you're willing to write off half the nation before you even take office. >> brown: with the economy dominating the campaign, and with 12 million americans still unemployed, it was clear the punching and counter-punching over jobs will only grow more intense. and there's still one more monthly employment report coming-- on november 2, four days before election day. to help break down the jobs numbers, i am joined by
over the years. there's two main categories they have. one is how to reduce the size of government, and the other half of it is this model legislation that's in the corporate good. in other words, there's a profit driven legislation. how can you open up a new market? how can you privatize something that can open up a market for a company? and between those two divisions you are kind of getting to the same end goal which is really kind of ultimate privatization of everything. >> mark pocan is something of an expert on alec. in fact, to learn as much about it as he could, he became a member. >> what i realized is if you join alec for a mere hundred dollars as a legislator you have the full access like any corporate member. >> he also took himself to an alec conference for a first-hand look. >> hi, i'm state representative mark pocan. welcome to my video blog. i'm outside the marriott on canal street in new orleans at the alec convention, american legislative exchange council. that was where you watch the interaction of a room full of lobbyists-free drinks, free cigars, wining, dining
afghan civilians and police were killed. in iraq, the government announced 365 people were killed during september, the most in more than two years. the total included 26 iraqis who died sunday. a wave of bombings targeted shi- ite neighborhoods, from the northern city of kirkuk to the southern town of kut. the iraqi affiliate of al-qaeda claimed responsibility. iran has restored access to google's e-mail service, a week after the government blocked it. the initial action against g-mail was taken after an anti- islamic video appeared on google's video hosting site, youtube. but the loss of service drew complaints from users, including members of the iranian parliament. the people of greece got more grim news today: they're facing a sixth year of recession. a draft budget projected the greek economy will shrink again in 2013 by almost 4%. unemployment is set to rise another full point, to nearly 25%. meanwhile, euro-zone officials reported unemployment across the continent remained at a record high of 11.4% in august. . >> the figure is much higher than a year ago. it demonstrates the imp
-- all this while cutting tax rates and not changing the amount of money the federal government brings in. an analysis by the tax policy center shows governor romney will have to make some big tradeoffs. >> so, governor romney has made five promises. he can't keep them all. he is going to have to, at some point, abandon one of those promises. he cannot cut tax rates, cut taxes on the middle class, cut taxes on capital gains, and balance the budget all at once. >> reporter: romney advisers have said they would consider eliminating tax breaks on at least two forms of saving, life insurance and muni bonds. and the governor's supporters argue tax cuts generate enough growth to offset some of their cost. >> people can have reasonable disagreements about the magnitude of that growth effect, but to assume that it is zero, i think, is wrong. and once you relax that assumption, then, all of a sudden, other things start to be possible. >> reporter: but it's hard to be sure about the impact of tax cuts on the economy, which is why the experts in congress and the treasury who are responsible for esti
have is hiring that is concentrated, most recently, in the government sector. hiring that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of positive news coming from construction. but in a lot of the business services and goods-producing industries and manufacturing, things look pretty soft at this moment. >> reporter: in addition, 2,000 temporary jobs were cut, which is often looked at as a barameter of future employment. but, the average work week rose to 34-and a half hours... and employers typically boost the workload of existing staff.. before taking on new workers. with all these cross-currents, the employment situation may be but the bottom line seems to be that the economy is improving, but not nearly as quickly as most people would like. >> we lost so many jobs during the great recession, that we are slowly clawing our way out of that hole.. but still at a pretty slow pace." >> reporter: the government's next jobs report will come out just 4 days before the presidential election. by then, many voters will have made up their minds. so
, but not on any resolution to the scheduled tax increases in government spending cuts. the nonpartisan tax policy center figures taxeses will go up by almost $3500 per household next year if certain tax cuts are allowed to expire. the report says 90% of households would see higher federal taxes. you can learn more about the fiscal cliff and why it matters, go to our website: nokia is on track to team up with major software-maker oracle. the finnish cell phone company is giving oracle access to its mapping services. financial details of the deal were not disclosed. but the move comes as nokia recently signed mapping deals with groupon, and amazon. last week apple's c.e.o. apologized for the shortcomings of its new map service. >> susie: and american express has agreed to pay millions of dollars in refunds to settle accusations from regulators that it deceived customers. the violations include: unlawful late fees, misleading consumers about debt collection, and age discrimination. amex will pay more than $100 million in fines, and give payouts to about 250,000 customers. consumers that
've got to tell their government to stop cyber attacking the united states. >> reporter: huawei aggressively pushed back. the company says the intelligence committee provided no clear evidence of wrong doing and it dismissed the report as politically motivated. a spokesman for huawei says the company is owned by its employees and its work around the world is trusted and proven. >> our procurements from us companies totaled $6.6 billion. that's tens of thousands of jobs. these recommendations put at risk american jobs. >> reporter: huawei appears to operate as a purely commercial enterprise, but it is hard to sort out who owns the company and how much of it. the intelligence committee report concludes some chinese telecomm equipment secretly transmitted information back to china. that's what concerns u.s. cyber- security experts. they fear the chinese government could use huawei's technology to access sensitive information. >> i think it is a legitimate concern. now the question is how much that concern is being used in the u.s. to block a much larger range of investments, becaus
said the shelling came from syrian government forces. hours later, turkish artillery fired back, at unnamed targets inside syria. and, turkey's nato allies demanded an immediate halt to hostile action against the turks. meanwhile, three suicide car bombings killed at least 34 people in syria's embattled city of aleppo. the attack was on a government- controlled section. the coordinated explosions hit a central square, destroying a number of buildings and littering the streets with twisted metal and concrete. at least 122 people were wounded. and the death toll was expected to rise as crews work through the rubble. in iran, riot police and protesters came to blows over the collapse of the national currency. the rial has lost a third of its value in less than a week. today, merchants at tehran's main bazaar protested outside their stalls and closed for the day. exchange houses and currency websites also were closed down. in the end, police arrested money changers and fired tear gas to disperse crowds. the protesters charged president mahmoud ahmadinejad's policies have fueled the
. >> reporter: but government auditors report most federal job-training programs have not done the expensive studies needed to determine whether or not they are effective. and those that have done impact studies find only small or short-term benefits from job training. >> which i think is remarkable that, after five decades, that the main federal auditor, the g.a.o., can't really find that these programs work really well at all. >> reporter: but governor romney still talks up job training. he backs personal reemployment accounts that workers can use to find training and job counseling. and he wants states to take the lead, not the federal government. there are now 47 different federal training programs, and romney calls that duplication a waste. >> all that money, all that overhead-- what i want to do is take those dollars and bundle it up, send it back to nevada and say, "you train your people for the jobs the people of nevada need and want." >> reporter: most of those 47 programs are very small and they're aimed at groups like veterans and the poor. governor romney would replace them with
was surprisingly perky in september. that's according to data out just two days before the government's crucial and more complete monthly jobs report. payroll processor a.d.p. said employers added 162,000 jobs last month, stronger than expected. but the pace is slowing, and numbers for july and august were revised lower. still, there are signs the job market is improving, but no where close to replenishing the jobs lost in the great recession. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: few things would make more americans happy than a healthy job market. from recent college grads to president obama, their future might look more certain if companies really ramped up hiring. economists say there's too much uncertainty on the horizon for that to happen any time soon. the good news is that firms have stopped cutting jobs. the bad news is they're still too nervous to hire more than a handful of new workers. friday, economists predict the september employment report will show a modest 113,000 new positions were added, barely better than august. still, some believe current data underestimates what's really h
center for al-shabab, the group that's fought somalia's internationally backed government for years. al-shabab is allied with al- qaeda, but the militants now have been driven out of all of somalia's major cities. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the men at the top of the presidential tickets hunkered down again today for debate preparation, ahead of the big meeting tomorrow night. but they also managed to break away briefly-- president obama for a visit to the hoover dam, and governor romney out with an aide to buy lunch, a burrito. meanwhile, their running mates made multiple stops in key states. vice president biden told a crowd in charlotte, north carolina that mitt romney would raise taxes on most americans to fund tax cuts for the wealthy. >> how they can justify raising taxes on the middle class has been buried the last four years. how in lord's name can they justify raising their taxes with these tax cuts? look, folks, we've seen this movie before. massive tax cuts for the wealthy. eliminating restrictions on wall street. let the banks w
and z.t.e. the house intelligence committee reported both have close ties to the government of china. it said using their components in u.s. computer networks could let them steal trade secrets or even shut down vital systems in a time of crisis. the two firms denied any such association to the chinese government. venezuela's leftist president hugo chavez will serve another six years after winning reelection sunday. his margin of victory was ten points, the narrowest in his 14 years in power. it was a bitterly fought race against challenger henrique capriles, who conceded defeat. chavez welcomed that concession last night, as supporters poured into the streets and surrounded the presidential palace. he addressed them from the balcony. >> my gratitude to the right wing candidate and his campaign managers who announced to the country that they recognize our victory. this is a very important step for peace in venezuela, for our coexistence. >> sreenivasan: chavez is expected to step up his push for socialism, and to continue his longstanding criticism of u.s. foreign policy. turkey reta
measure. that's a little bit scary, too, particularly because it guarantees local governments $5 billion a year for realignment. a constitutional spending commitment on a temporary tax. that's kind of uncertain, as well. >> belva: we have so many hot issues, we have to move to one that is really hot, because it is burning the pocketbooks of the people of the state, and that's gas prices that seem to be gone a bit wild. >> to a record price in san francisco today, probably around the state by tomorrow. the average price in the bay area is $4.55. that is 16 cents more than yesterday. 37 cents more than a week ago and 70 cents higher than a year ago. so, it is a huge problem for the state of california. there are six primary factors that are contributing to this and they are very important. one is the chevron refinery that's 1 out of 8 gallons of fuel in the state of california. that's out of service for many months to come there was a major pipeline that chevron owns and operates that has been shut down since the middle of september, out of service, denies amount of crude oil, cutting down
was 23 and 24. >> as a reporter? >> as a reporter. it was the usual thing in mexico. the government would say what you could say on the air and what you couldn't say on the air. i decided i didn't want to be that kind of reporter so i sold everything and came to the united states. just imagine that now i can talk to anyone without asking permission for anything. i had to leave my country because of that. it used to be said that the powerful and the rich never leave their country, only those who need possibilities and those who are poor and those who are ambitious leave their countries. that's exactly what happened with me. i came here because i had to come here. something pushed me out of mexico and something pulled me from the united states. now i have two passports, but honestly i have to thank this country because it gave me all the wonderful opportunities. if i would have stayed in mexico, i don't know what would have happened but i would have been a very poor, sad and probably censored journalist. >> why did your parents come? >> my parents came in the 1940s and it was because my fat
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)